Current Publication | x
Close

Network Settings

Some network settings are configured during system installation and rarely need to be changed. Revising some network settings (host names, IP addresses, or domains) requires a system restart and terminates all active conferences.

The RealPresence DMA system needs to be accessible by its host name(s), not just its IP address(es), so you must create A and/or AAAA records for IPv4 and IPv6, respectively, as well as the corresponding PTR records, on your DNS server(s). A/AAAA records that map each physical host name to the corresponding physical IP address and each virtual host name to the corresponding virtual IP address are mandatory, as are the corresponding PTR records that allow reverse DNS resolution of the system’s physical or virtual host name(s).

If the RealPresence DMA system uses a CA-provided identity certificate, changing host names or IP addresses also requires that you update the certificate. If the revised settings require a new certificate, the system will automatically generate a new self-signed certificate.

You cannot configure or revise network settings under the following circumstances:

While the system is part of a supercluster – you must first leave the supercluster and, if the cluster is responsible for any territories (as primary or backup), reassign those territories. After the making the network changes, the system can rejoin the supercluster.

When the system is integrated with a Polycom RealPresence Resource Manager system – you must first terminate the integration. After the making the network changes, the system can reintegrate with the Polycom RealPresence Resource Manager system.

When the system is configured for High Availability (HA) – you must disable HA before you revise any network settings. After the making the network changes, HA can be re-enabled.

Configure General System Network Settings

Some of the General System Network Settings are configured during system installation but can be changed when necessary. Note that changing some network settings (host names, IP addresses, or domains) requires a system restart and terminates all active conferences.

To configure general system network settings:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Complete the fields described in the following table as required.

Field

Description

General System Network Settings 
The settings in this section apply to the entire system and aren’t specific to management or signaling.
System IP type
Displays which type of addressing is currently enabled (IPv4 and/or IPv6).
Host name
The host name of the system.
If a DHCP server assigned the host name during system installation, you can select Override DHCP Settings and enter a host name that overrides the DHCP-assigned host name.
Domain
The domain for the system. This is combined with the host name to form the fully qualified domain name (FQDN). For instance:

Host name: dma1 

Domain: callservers.example.com

FQDN: dma1.callservers.example.com 

If a DHCP server assigned the domain during system installation, you can select Override DHCP Settings and enter a domain that overrides the DHCP-assigned domain.
DNS search domains
One or more fully qualified domain names, separated by commas or spaces. The domain you enter for the system is added automatically.
If a DHCP server assigned DNS search domains during system installation, you can select Override DHCP Settings and enter DNS search domains that override the ones assigned by DHCP.
DNS 1
IP addresses of up to three domain name servers. At least one DNS server is required.
DNS queries on any configured network interface will be sent to the same DNS name servers (in order).
If a DHCP server assigned DNS 1 during system installation, you can select Override DHCP Settings and enter a primary DNS that overrides the one assigned by DHCP.
Note that the system uses the secondary DNS server only if the primary DNS server is unreachable, and uses the tertiary DNS server only if the primary and secondary servers are unreachable.
DNS 2
DNS 3

3 Click Update to save the settings.

Configure Network Interface Settings

You can configure general, IPv4, and IPv6 settings for any network interface. Note that Link Settings and LAN Security Settings can be configured only for NIC interfaces.

Changing some network settings (host names, IP addresses, or domains) requires a system restart and terminates all active conferences.

 

If you configure any interface as STATIC, you cannot configure any other interface as DHCP.
If you configure any interface as DHCP, you cannot configure another interface.

To configure network interface settings:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 In the Network Interface Settings section, select an interface to configure and click the Edit Selected Interface button.

3 Configure the settings for the network interface as described in the following table:

Field

Description

General NIC
Enable
If an interface has services assigned to it, it cannot be disabled. Services must first be re-assigned to another interface.
Name
The name of a NIC network interface is not editable.The names of bonded and VLAN interfaces are generated.
MAC address
The MAC address of the network interface card.

IPv4 Configuration

IPv4 boot protocol
The IPv4 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC or DHCP.
Caution: If you configure any interface as STATIC, you cannot configure any other interface as DHCP. If you configure any interface as DHCP, you cannot configure another interface.
IPv4 address/prefix length*
IPv4 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size of the interface.
IPv4 gateway*
IPv4 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.
MTU size
The Maximum Transmission Unit size for the network interface. The default size set by Linux is 1500. It is recommended that you leave this field blank to use the system’s default value.
Caution: If you set the MTU size to a value not supported by your network, you may lose access to the RealPresence DMA system management user interface. Additionally, all network devices (switches, routers, other RealPresence DMA systems, MCUs, and others) that exchange network packets through the configured interface must have the same MTU size setting. If these other devices are not configured with the same MTU size, the connection to the RealPresence DMA system will not work.  
NAT address
If the RealPresence DMA system is deployed behind a firewall using Network Address Translation (NAT) for public access, the value for this field is the public address that is used to access this interface.
Specify a NAT address only if services are assigned to the network interface.

IPv6 Configuration

IPv6 boot protocol
The IPv6 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC, SLAAC, or DHCP6.
Caution: If you configure any interface as STATIC, you cannot configure any other interface as DHCP6. If you configure any interface as DHCP6, you cannot configure another interface.
IPv6 (global) address/prefix length
IPv6 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv6 (link-local)
The IPv6 link-local address, which is not visible outside of the link.
IPv6 gateway
IPv6 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the local link.

Link Settings

Auto-negotiation

Turn on Auto-negotiation or set Speed and Duplex manually.
Note: Auto-negotiation is required if your network is 1000Base-T. Do not select 10000 unless you are certain your hardware platform supports it.

Speed

Duplex

LAN Security Settings

Enable 802.1x

Enables the system to authenticate this network interface to the LAN. Depending on the authentication method, the access credentials required may be either a user name and password or a security certificate.
Caution: In a network that requires 802.1x authentication for servers (this is rarely the case), incorrect settings in this section and, if applicable, lack of the proper certificate(s) can make the system unreachable. Recovering from this situation requires connecting a laptop to the system using a crossover cable in order to access it.

User name

The user name with which the system may authenticate this interface.

Password

Confirm password

The password for the user name entered above.

EAP Method

The Extensible Authentication Protocol method used to establish trust with the authentication server (also known as the outer authentication protocol).

Protocol

When a TLS tunnel is established with the authentication server, the protocol used within the tunnel (this is also known as the inner authentication protocol).

4 Click OK to save the settings.

Configure Service Settings

If your RealPresence DMA system has a core configuration, you can assign management and signaling services to any interface that is enabled and configured with either a static or dynamic IP address. The services can be assigned to the same or different interfaces.

If your RealPresence DMA system has an edge configuration, in addition to assigning management services to an interface, you can also assign the following edge-related services to network interfaces and specify a private and public IP address for each interface.

Signaling

Media Traversal

Access Proxy

TURN

Interfaces without services assigned may still be used in High Availability (HA) configurations for HA communication between systems.

To configure service settings:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click Services.

3 Configure the management and signaling settings as described in the following table:

Field

Descriptions

 

Management Services

Interface

The interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for management traffic.

DSCP

The Differentiated Services Code Point value (0 - 63) to put in the DS field of IP packet headers on outbound packets associated with management traffic (including communications to other RealPresence DMA systems).
The DSCP value is used to classify packets for quality of service (QoS) purposes. If you are not sure what value to use, leave the default of 0.
Allow edge services
When selected, this option enables edge-related services to be configured on network interfaces.

Signaling Services

Private
Public

Interface

The private interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for signaling traffic to internal network endpoints or other devices. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.
The public interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for signaling traffic. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.

DSCP

The Differentiated Services Code Point value (0 - 63) to put in the DS field of IP packet headers on outbound packets for signaling traffic.
The DSCP value is used to classify packets for quality of service (QoS) purposes. If you are not sure what value to use, leave the default of 0.
NA

Media Traversal Services

(available only on edge-configured systems)
Private
Public

Interface

The private interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for media traffic to internal network endpoints or other devices. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.
The public interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for media traffic. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.

DSCP

The Differentiated Services Code Point value (0 - 63) to put in the DS field of IP packet headers on outbound packets for media traffic.
The DSCP value is used to classify packets for quality of service (QoS) purposes. If you are not sure what value to use, leave the default of 0.
NA

Access Proxy Services

(available only on edge-configured systems)
Private
Public

Interface

The private interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for access proxy traffic to internal network endpoints or other devices. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.
The public interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for access proxy traffic. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.

DSCP

The Differentiated Services Code Point value (0 - 63) to put in the DS field of IP packet headers on outbound packets for access proxy traffic.
The DSCP value is used to classify packets for quality of service (QoS) purposes. If you are not sure what value to use, leave the default of 0.
NA

TURN Services

Private
Public

Interface

The private interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for TURN traffic to internal network WebRTC endpoints. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.
The public interface the RealPresence DMA system uses for TURN traffic. This may be a network interface card, a VLAN interface, or a bonded interface.

DSCP

The Differentiated Services Code Point value (0 - 63) to put in the DS field of IP packet headers on outbound packets for TURN traffic.
The DSCP value is used to classify packets for quality of service (QoS) purposes. If you are not sure what value to use, leave the default of 0.
 

4 Click OK to save the settings and restart the system.

Routing Configuration

If your network configuration requires specific routing for some subnet(s), you can use static routes to handle the requirements.

Add a Static Route

You can configure static route settings only if they are valid for the current network settings. If you need to change both the network settings and routing configuration, change the network settings first to prevent system errors.

To add a static route:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click Routing Configuration.

3 Select the Default gateway device.

The Default gateway device is the network interface designated as the default route when no other routing rules match the destination network address.

4 Click Add Route.

5 Complete the fields in the following table as required:

Field

Description

Interface
Select the interface for this route.
Subnet
The target address prefix for the route. It should consist of a network specification, for example, "192.168.9.0" or "192.168.0.0".
Prefix length
The CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask). This value, together with the Subnet address, define the destination network for this route.
Via
IP address of the next hop or gateway for this route.

6 Click OK.

The static route displays in the Static Routes table.

7 Repeat the preceding steps to add more routes.

8 When you have added all necessary routes, click OK to save the routes and restart the system.

Delete a Static Route

You can delete static routes as needed.

To delete a static route:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click Routing Configuration.

3 Select a static route from the list and click Delete Selected Route to delete it.

4 Click OK.

Bonded and VLAN Interfaces

The RealPresence DMA system supports the use of logical interfaces in addition to physical network interfaces. You can add bonded and VLAN interfaces that can provide increased bandwidth and redundancy capabilities for your network interfaces.

A bonded interface can be configured to combine two or more physical NICs into a single logical network interface. This is also known as Link Aggregation. When bonded, the NICs appear to be the same physical device. Bonding requires a switch that supports and is configured for Link Aggregation Control protocol (LACP), as described in IEEE 802.3ad.

VLAN interfaces can be created by splitting a single NIC link into multiple logical links. The physical NIC defines the VLAN interfaces (e.g., eth1.1, eth1.2, etc.), each of which is a logical network interface configured with an IP address. Each VLAN interface is associated with a subnet on a VLAN trunk supplied by a switch that carries VLAN traffic, as described in IEEE 802.1Q. An aggregated link (bonded interface) can also be configured to deliver a VLAN trunk.

You can assign RealPresence DMA system services such as management and signaling to both physical and logical interfaces. Also, both types of interfaces can be used for communication between two RealPresence DMA systems configured for High Availability.

Note that the NICs associated with a logical interface should not be:

Assigned IP addresses

Used in firewall rules

Used in network packet captures

Used in traceroute

Used in ping

Add a Bonded Interface

A bonded interface can increase available bandwidth and provide NIC failover protection. You can add a bonded interface to combine two or more NICs into a single logical network connection. The logical network interface is typically represented by bond0, bond1...bond n. The NICs (eth1, eth2, etc.) are considered slaves of the bonded interface.

To add a bonded interface:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Under ACTIONS, click Add Bonded Interface.

3 Configure the settings for the bonded interface as described in the following table:

Field

Description

General Bonded
Name
The RealPresence DMA system generates the name of the interface based on the number of bonded interfaces already configured, starting with bond0 and incrementing by 1, e.g., bond1, bond2, etc.
Enable
Select the check box if the bonded interface will be assigned IP addresses.
If the bonded interface is configured at the switch to deliver a VLAN trunk, complete the necessary configuration and then uncheck the Enable check box before clicking OK to save the interface. You will add one or more VLAN interfaces later, which will automatically enable the bonded interface.
Available NICs
The interfaces available for aggregation.
Bonding policy
This policy is applied to the bonded interface but the switch must be configured to support the policy you select.
The following bonding policy values are available:
balance-rr – Sets a round-robin policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Transmissions are received and sent out sequentially on each bonded slave interface beginning with the first one available.
active-backup – Sets an active-backup policy for fault tolerance. Transmissions are received and sent out via the first available bonded slave interface. Another bonded slave interface is only used if the active bonded slave interface fails.
balance-xor – Sets an XOR (exclusive-or) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Using this method, the interface matches the incoming request's MAC address with the MAC address for one of the slave NICs. Once this link is established, transmissions are sent out sequentially beginning with the first available interface.
broadcast – Sets a broadcast policy for fault tolerance. All transmissions are sent on all slave interfaces.
802.3ad – Sets an IEEE 802.3ad dynamic link aggregation policy. Creates aggregation groups that share the same speed and duplex settings. Transmits and receives on all slaves in the active aggregator. Requires a switch that is 802.3ad compliant.
 
balance-tlb – Sets a Transmit Load Balancing (TLB) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. The outgoing traffic is distributed according to the current load on each slave interface. Incoming traffic is received by the current slave. If the receiving slave fails, another slave takes over the MAC address of the failed slave. This mode is only suitable for local addresses known to the kernel bonding module and therefore cannot be used behind a bridge with virtual machines.‘
balance-alb – Sets an Adaptive Load Balancing (ALB) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Includes transmit and receive load balancing for IPv4 traffic. Receive load balancing is achieved through ARP negotiation. This mode is only suitable for local addresses known to the kernel bonding module and therefore cannot be used behind a bridge with virtual machines.
Link monitoring
When selected, enables the RealPresence DMA system to monitor the physical NICs to ensure they are working. Primarily used for bonding policies that provide redundancy.
Monitoring frequency (ms)
If Link monitoring is selected, specify how often the system checks the physical NICs. A recommended starting point is 100 ms.
Link up delay (ms)
The length of time the system waits before enabling a link connection after a restart; must be a multiple of the Monitoring frequency value. Entering zero disables the link up delay.
Link down delay (ms)
The length of time the system waits after a link fails before disabling the connection; must be a multiple of the Monitoring frequency value. Entering zero disables the link down delay.

IPv4 Configuration

IPv4 boot protocol
The IPv4 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC or DHCP.
IPv4 address/prefix length
IPv4 address and CIDR (network mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv4 gateway
IPv4 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

IPv6 Configuration

IPv6 boot protocol
The IPv6 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC, SLAAC, or DHCP.
IPv6 (global) address/prefix length
IPv6 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv6 (link-local)
The IPv6 link-local address, which is not visible outside of the link.
IPv6 gateway
IPv6 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

4 Click OK.

Edit a Bonded Interface

You can edit the network interface settings for a bonded interface when necessary. A bonded interface can increase available bandwidth and provide NIC failover protection. You can add a bonded interface to combine two or more NICs into a single logical network connection. The logical network interface is typically represented by bond0, bond1...bond n. The NICs (eth1, eth2, etc.) are considered slaves of the bonded interface.

To edit a bonded interface:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Under Network Interface Settings, select the bonded interface to edit.

3 Click the Edit button at the top of the table.

4 Configure the settings for the bonded interface as described in the following table:

Field

Description

General Bonded
Name
The RealPresence DMA system generates the name of the interface based on the number of bonded interfaces already configured, starting with bond0 and incrementing by 1, e.g., bond1, bond2, etc.
Enable
Select the check box if the bonded interface will be assigned IP addresses.
If the bonded interface is configured at the switch to deliver a VLAN trunk, complete the necessary configuration and then uncheck the Enable check box before clicking OK to save the interface. You will add one or more VLAN interfaces later, which will automatically enable the bonded interface.
Available NICs
The interfaces available for aggregation.
Bonding policy
This policy is applied to the bonded interface but the switch must be configured to support the policy you select.
The following bonding policy values are available:
balance-rr – Sets a round-robin policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Transmissions are received and sent out sequentially on each bonded slave interface beginning with the first one available.
active-backup – Sets an active-backup policy for fault tolerance. Transmissions are received and sent out via the first available bonded slave interface. Another bonded slave interface is only used if the active bonded slave interface fails.
balance-xor – Sets an XOR (exclusive-or) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Using this method, the interface matches the incoming request's MAC address with the MAC address for one of the slave NICs. Once this link is established, transmissions are sent out sequentially beginning with the first available interface.
broadcast – Sets a broadcast policy for fault tolerance. All transmissions are sent on all slave interfaces.
802.3ad – Sets an IEEE 802.3ad dynamic link aggregation policy. Creates aggregation groups that share the same speed and duplex settings. Transmits and receives on all slaves in the active aggregator. Requires a switch that is 802.3ad compliant.
 
balance-tlb – Sets a Transmit Load Balancing (TLB) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. The outgoing traffic is distributed according to the current load on each slave interface. Incoming traffic is received by the current slave. If the receiving slave fails, another slave takes over the MAC address of the failed slave. This mode is only suitable for local addresses known to the kernel bonding module and therefore cannot be used behind a bridge with virtual machines.‘
balance-alb – Sets an Adaptive Load Balancing (ALB) policy for fault tolerance and load balancing. Includes transmit and receive load balancing for IPv4 traffic. Receive load balancing is achieved through ARP negotiation. This mode is only suitable for local addresses known to the kernel bonding module and therefore cannot be used behind a bridge with virtual machines.
Link monitoring
When selected, enables the RealPresence DMA system to monitor the physical NICs to ensure they are working. Primarily used for bonding policies that provide redundancy.
Monitoring frequency (ms)
If Link monitoring is selected, specify how often the system checks the physical NICs. A recommended starting point is 100 ms.
Link up delay (ms)
The length of time the system waits before enabling a link connection after a restart; must be a multiple of the Monitoring frequency value. Entering zero disables the link up delay.
Link down delay (ms)
The length of time the system waits after a link fails before disabling the connection; must be a multiple of the Monitoring frequency value. Entering zero disables the link down delay.

IPv4 Configuration

IPv4 boot protocol
The IPv4 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC or DHCP.
IPv4 address/prefix length
IPv4 address and CIDR (network mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv4 gateway
IPv4 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

IPv6 Configuration

IPv6 boot protocol
The IPv6 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC, SLAAC, or DHCP.
IPv6 (global) address/prefix length
IPv6 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv6 (link-local)
The IPv6 link-local address, which is not visible outside of the link.
IPv6 gateway
IPv6 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

5 Click OK.

Add a VLAN Interface

VLAN interfaces can be created by splitting a single NIC link into multiple logical links. The physical NIC defines the VLAN interfaces (e.g., eth1.1, eth1.2, etc.), each of which is a logical network interface configured with an IP address. Each VLAN interface is associated with a subnet on a VLAN trunk supplied by a switch that carries VLAN traffic, as described in IEEE 802.1Q. An aggregated link (bonded interface) can also be configured to deliver a VLAN trunk.

To add a VLAN interface:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Under ACTIONS, click Add VLAN Interface.

3 Configure the settings for the VLAN interface as described in the following table:

Field

Description

Name
The RealPresence DMA system assigns the name of the VLAN interface when you save the VLAN Interface Settings. The name is a combination of the interface (NIC or bond) on which you create the VLAN interface and the VLAN ID, for example, eth2.1, where eth2 is the parent interface and 1 is the VLAN ID.
VLAN ID
The numeric ID of the VLAN interface. The ID specifies the individual network within the VLAN trunk that the interface will be connected to.
Interface
The available interfaces (NIC or bond) on which you can create a VLAN interface.

IP Configuration

IPv4 boot protocol
The IPv4 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC or DHCP.
IPv4 address/prefix length
IPv4 address and CIDR (network mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv4 gateway
IPv4 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.
IPv6 boot protocol
The IPv6 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC, SLAAC, or DHCP.
IPv6 (global) address/prefix length
IPv6 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask) that define the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface. Routable anywhere/scoped globally.
IPv6 (link-local)
The IPv6 link-local address, which is not visible outside of the link.
IPv6 gateway
IPv6 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

4 Click OK.

Edit a VLAN Interface

VLAN interfaces can be created by splitting a single NIC link into multiple logical links. The physical NIC defines the VLAN interfaces (e.g., eth1.1, eth1.2, etc.), each of which is a logical network interface configured with an IP address. Each VLAN interface is associated with a subnet on a VLAN trunk supplied by a switch that carries VLAN traffic, as described in IEEE 802.1Q. An aggregated link (bonded interface) can also be configured to deliver a VLAN trunk.

To edit a VLAN interface:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Under Network Interface Settings, select the VLAN interface to edit.

3 Click the Edit button at the top of the table.

4 Configure the settings for the VLAN interface as described in the following table:

Field

Description

Name
The RealPresence DMA system assigns the name of the VLAN interface when you save the VLAN Interface Settings. The name is a combination of the interface (NIC or bond) on which you create the VLAN interface and the VLAN ID, for example, eth2.1, where eth2 is the parent interface and 1 is the VLAN ID.
VLAN ID
The numeric ID of the VLAN interface. The ID specifies the individual network within the VLAN trunk that the interface will be connected to.
Interface
The available interfaces (NIC or bond) on which you can create a VLAN interface.

IP Configuration

IPv4 boot protocol
The IPv4 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC or DHCP.
IPv4 address/prefix length
IPv4 address and CIDR (network mask) that defines the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface.
IPv4 gateway
IPv4 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.
IPv6 boot protocol
The IPv6 boot protocol of the network interface. Options are STATIC, SLAAC, or DHCP.
IPv6 (global) address/prefix length
IPv6 address and the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) prefix size value (the number of leading 1 bits in the routing prefix mask) that define the subnetwork of the system’s management or combined interface. Routable anywhere/scoped globally.
IPv6 (link-local)
The IPv6 link-local address, which is not visible outside of the link.
IPv6 gateway
IPv6 address of the gateway server used to route network traffic outside the subnet.

5 Click OK.

Enable IPv6

You can configure your RealPresence DMA network settings to use IPv4 or IPv6 addressing. The system also supports IPv4 and IPv6 addressing simultaneously in a mixed mode environment.

To enable IPv6 Settings:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click Enable IPv6.

A list of all enabled network interfaces displays.

3 For each enabled interface, configure the following settings:

Ø Type – the system IP address type (STATIC, DHCP6, or SLAAC)

Ø IPv6 Address

Ø IPv6 Gateway

4 Click OK to enable IPv6 addressing.

Enable IPv4

You can configure your RealPresence DMA network settings to use IPv4 or IPv6 addressing. The system also supports IPv4 and IPv6 addressing simultaneously in a mixed mode environment.

To enable IPv4 Settings:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click Enable IPv4.

A list of all enabled network interfaces displays.

3 For each enabled interface, configure the following settings:

Ø Type – the system IP address type (STATIC, DHCP)

Ø IPv4 Address

Ø IPv4 Gateway

4 Click OK to enable IPv4 addressing.

Edit System Ephemeral Ports

The RealPresence DMA system uses local ephemeral ports to make outbound network connections for transient services and operations not otherwise defined with their own specific port ranges. For example, when the system contacts another RealPresence DMA system to perform some administrative function (invite the other system into an HA pair, automatically configure VPN tunnel entries, etc.), the first system may use a local ephemeral port to initiate the HTTPS connection to the peer's 8443 port.

The RealPresence DMA default system ephemeral port range is 52000-60000. Changing the default port range is not recommended except when it conflicts with the ports or port ranges of other services (for example, H.323 signaling) after upgrading the RealPresence DMA system software. If a conflict occurs, you can revise the system ephemeral port range to avoid having to change the port ranges of other services that would also require firewall changes.

The system ephemeral port range must be 500 or more ports.

To edit system ephemeral ports:

1 Go to Admin > Server > Network Settings.

2 Click System Ephemeral Ports.

3 Revise the First port and/or the Last port as needed.

4 Click OK to save the changes.

Related Topics

Machine Translation

You are cautioned that the translation of this document is generated by a machine; therefore, the translated document may have errors and be inconsistent with the original English language version of the document.

The English language version of this document shall be considered the governing document related to the Polycom product.

If there is any contradiction between the English language version of the document and the translated version of the document, the English language version of the document shall take precedence.

The translation is provided for your convenience only. Neither Google nor Polycom shall be responsible for translated content or for the performance of the translation tool. If you require further assistance on non-translation issues, please contact Polycom support.

Translated documents are not available in PDF format.