Connecting to Meetings

Depending on the deployed workflow model and the device from which a user is connecting, users can connect to meetings by dialing a VMR from a remote control or Polycom Touch Control, clicking on a SIP URI from a desktop client, or walking into a room to join a conference that was scheduled in advance.

To better explain the options available to you when configuring how users connect to meetings, this topic provides a sample company and a list of workflows they use.

Example Company A

Company A is configured with the following conditions and network configurations.

  • Employee meeting rooms are high-definition meeting rooms limited to 2 Mbps.
  • Company A supports video conferencing participation from both internal and external users using RealPresence Web Suite, which enables users to schedule meetings using the RealPresence Web Suite Services Portal and enables anyone to join meetings over a web browser.
  • On average, Company A sees approximately 70 % utilization of the core infrastructure. Most meetings include 5–10 participants along with a mixture of different endpoint types and locations. Some meetings are highly collaborative where many users share content while discussing the material; others consist of a group meeting or staff meeting lead primarily by one speaker or location at a time. For the most part, the company has adopted a “meet on the bridge” strategy, but some users still call point-to-point.
  • The help desk handles company-wide meetings or specific vendor events where they want the events scheduled and dialed out. These are typically high-definition conferences that utilize a mixture of devices and connection methods, including dial-in audio and RealPresence Web Suite connections. These calls typically have a high level of attendance from all locations and can span more than one RealPresence Collaboration Server.

Company A settles on three distinct workflows to enable all employees to collaborate simply and easily without much user training or help desk support.

Dialing in by Personal VMR

In Company A’s dial-in model, users are assigned a persistent personal VMR through Active Directory integration, which enables users to dial into their own VMR whenever they wish. No operator or Video Network Operations Center (VNOC) is required to monitor or schedule conferences.

The advantages of this model are as follows:

  • Self-service conferencing
  • Low conference admin overhead
  • Users connect to meetings from multiple types of devices, including room systems, desktop clients, and mobile devices

From an IT perspective, video conferencing usage in Company A is about 90 % self-service once each employee receives a personal VMR.


Network diagram of users connecting to meetings through a personal VMR (dial-in) model.
  • The users are in the Headquarter and home office of the Company A or will connect to the VMR from the Internet.
  • All endpoints and clients are directly registered to the RealPresence DMA or RealPresence DMA Edge of Company A.
  • All users establish an audio or video call to the VMR using the Remote Control, Touch Control, RealPresence Touch, Web UI, and Keypad.
  • The VMR can be called by dialing the E.164 number, SIP/TEL URI or IP address + Dial String (## or @) using manual dial, speed dial button and directory entry. All IVR services are available.
  • During the call, content can be sent from each user using VGA, HDMI, USB, UI, Web UI, People&Content IP, Pano, and RealPresence Desktop. Content is received from all other users as dual stream (H.239/BFCP/HTML5) in the highest available resolution and frame rate.
  • Automatic recording or manual recording is available. Transcoding of audio, video, and content algorithm and speed is available.
  • The highest available bandwidth for each call is based on the VMR profile setting.

Operator-Assisted Conferencing (Dial-Out)

In Company A’s dial-out model, users do not start or stop their own conferences. Instead, they use a centralized reservation service that is managed either by an internal service desk or by an external VNOC. This method of connecting to meetings is very popular with certain workgroups that schedule meetings that take place in conference rooms. The video conference starts automatically according to the schedule without any user interaction.


Network diagram of users connecting to meetings through a operated assisted scheduling (dial-out) model.

Multipoint meetings at Company A are usually scheduled in advance and initiated using operator assisted services. The operator sets up the conference by dialing out to all participants so the user does not need to launch the call locally.

Speed-Dial to Virtual Entry Queue

Users within the Company A video environment can also connect using the Speed-Dial to Virtual Entry Queue (VEQ) workflow model. This method enables video attendees and voice callers to easily dial into a VMR by using DTMF codes to enter the conference ID, where all participants can join the conference bridge. In this case, audio users dial the Company A headquarters using the toll free number and enter a VEQ where the IVR service asks for the conference ID. Internally, all video users can dial 771000 to call into the VEQ.

This solution is adapted to help people who feel that using multiple button functions on the remote control to connect to a conference causes confusion and frustration. This dialing method reduces the functions of the remote control to just one—entering the conference ID (VMR number) whenever a user clicks any button on the remote control.


Network diagram of users connecting to meetings through the Speed-Dial to VEQ model.
  • The users are in the Headquarters and home office of the Company A or will connect to the VEQ through the Internet.
  • All endpoints and clients are directly registered to the RealPresence DMA or RealPresence DMA Edge of Company A.
  • All users establish an audio or video call to the VEQ using the Remote Control, Touch Control, RealPresence Touch, Web UI and Keypad.
  • The VEQ can be called by dialing the E.164 number, SIP/TEL URI or IP address + Dial String (## or @) using manual dial, speed dial button and directory entry. All IVR services are available.
  • During the call, content can be sent from each user using VGA, HDMI, USB, UI, Web UI, People&Content IP, Pano, and RealPresence Desktop. Content is received from all other users as dual stream (H.239/BFCP/HTML5) in the highest available resolution and frame rate.
  • Automatic recording or manual recording is available.
  • The highest available bandwidth for each call is based on the VMR profile setting.